International Center of Photography’s new program

New York, 26 October 2011, Art Media Agency (AMA).

From 9 September 2011 to 8 January 2012 International Center of Photography, New York, is currently presenting three exhibitions: “Remembering 9/11”, “Harper’s Bazaar: A decade of Style” and “Signs of Life: Photographs by Peter Sekaer”.

As a duty to remember and in order to commemorate the anniversary of the ten years since the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, International Center of Photography presents in collaboration with National September 11 Memorial Museum, “Remembering 9/11”, an exhibition of photographs and films dedicated to witnesses of this major historical event. Between documentary and photojournalism, the corpus presents the works of Francesco Torres, Eugene Richard and Elena del Rivero through a thematic organisation in five parts.

“Harper’s Bazaar: A decade of Style” is an exhibition that also represents the last decade but in another theme: fashion. For ten years Glenda Bailey, editor of Harper’s Bazaar Magazine and Stephen Gan, artistic director, have worked on the selection of  image. The exhibition is thus centred on this period with a corpus of thirty photographs that were published in the magazine. We find photographers such as Peter Lindbergh, Jean-Paul Goude, David Bailey, William Klein, Patrick Demarchelier, Tim Walker, Mario Sorrenti, Hiro, Melvin Sokolsky and Karl Lagerfeld. Some artists like Nan Goldin, Ralph Gibson and Chuck Close could also be seen.

The third exhibition is dedicated to the Danish documentary photographer Peter Sekaer (1901-1950). Previously a painter by education, Sekaer turned to photography ever since 1934 and joined Berenice Abbott’s class at the New School Social Research. Sekear was friends with Walker Evans in the 1940s and worked for governmental programs such as Farm Security Administration, charged to report on rural poverty through images. This is the first major retrospective dedicated to the photographer that explores through 80 photographs his production from 1935 to 1945.