Archive for “change”

Laurel Gitlen Gallery expanding

New York, 29 June 2012, Art Media Agency (AMA).

In September, Laurel Gitlen will move her eponymous gallery in New York from 261 Broome Street to 122 Norfolk. Indeed, this gallery’s too much restricted space did not permit the organization of large-scale exhibitions, while the new 180 m2 at the ground floor will enable her to appropriately promote her numerous artists. Besides, her most famous artists include Corin Hewitt and Jessica Jackson Hutchins. During a telephonic interview for the GalleristNY website, she declared, with a bit of nostalgia, that the space she had occupied had been marvelous but that it was nevertheless time to move on and expand. She had been looking for a space such as the one in 122 Norfolk for almost a year. This relocation has been made possible as several galleries also moved towards larger spaces.

Increasing activity of galleries at fairs and online

Brussels, 29 July 2011, Art Media Agency (AMA).

Cinoa’s latest report illustrates that the activity of galleries is increasingly taking place online and at major fairs.

Like with any other profession or trade, gallery owners and art dealers have to evolve and the report shows that the physical location of galleries are less important and that a growing number of sales take place on the internet and at fairs. Dominique Lévy of L&M gallery declared in the Art Newspaper: “We do much more business at the fairs than at the gallery.”

However, the report minimises this phenomenon, concluding that contact, expertise, advice from art dealers and the relationships between professionals and clients are still highly-regarded qualities. Moreover, recent projects launched online are often linked to a physical location. The report and the professionals agree that expensive major pieces are not sold online.

In addition, galleries and art dealers still build their reputations based on the exhibitions they organise and the artists they represent. Internet and fairs are only tools and professionals still have to undertake research and promotions and forge relationships – characteristics that fairs and internet can not replace.