Archive for “The Art Newspaper”

London-based Soviet Realist show moves from Royal Academy

London, 29 October 2013, Art Media Agency (AMA).

An exhibition of works by Soviet Realist artist Viktor Popkov, originally planned to be shown at London’s Royal Academy, has been moved to the city’s Somerset House, where it is to be on display between 20 May and 24 June 2014.

Commenting on the decision via an article published in The Art Newspaper, a spokesperson for the RA stated: “despite the merits of Viktor Popkov, it was decided that the exhibition did not fit the requirements of the programme in Burlington Gardens [the building behind the RA’s main galleries] at this particular juncture.”

The exhibition is to feature around 40 works by the artist, and is supported by Andrey Filatov, the art collector and billionaire owner of N-Trans. Commenting on the show, Filatov describes Popkov as “the Dostoyevsky of art”, complaining that the artist is “widely known in Russia, but barely known elsewhere”. Filatov set Popkov’s auction record in 2010, when he purchased the artist’s Summer, July, from Sotheby’s New York, for $842,500.

The show is being organised by the State Museum and Exhibition Centre Rosizo in Moscow. Works on display are to be drawn from a number of Russian institutions, including the State Russian Museum, St Petersburg, and the Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

World’s leading photographers censored

New South Wales, 6 August 2013, Art Media Agency (AMA).

A number of images taken by some of the world’s leading photographers have faced censorship, after Sandra Chipchase, the chief executive of public arts festival Vivid Sydney, deemed that they were not “in keeping with the values of the event.”

The images were to form part of an associated festival titled “Reportage” (25 May – 13 June), directed by Stephen Dupont. The event featured works by prominent documentary photographers, and was to include pieces by Daniel Berehulak,  Yuri Kozyrev, Paula Bronstein, Ashley Gilbertson, Tim Page, Francesco Zizola and David Burnet, as well as works by Dupont himself.

According to a report in The Art Newspaper, Dupont and several other organisers behind the event were confused by Chipchase’s decision to remove around half of the show’s 35 pieces from the display, believing that those who had elected to do so had failed to realised the calibre of photographers featured in Reportage. Dupont stated that many of the photographers “have risked their lives [to get their photographs]” and added that “Nachtwey is one of the most famous documentary photographers in the world.”

Removed images included an Andrew Quilty’s photograph of fire-ravaged bushland and James Nacthwey’s  photograph of a young Rwandan man, scarred by tribal violence of the 1990s, which won the World Press Award.  Speaking in an official statement, Chipchase stated that “Vivid Sydney is a family-friendly event.”

Dan Flavin estate lifts ban on posthumous production of light sculptures

New York, 11 June 2013, Art Media Agency (AMA).

The Dan Flavin Estate has reverse its decision to ban the posthumous production of planned light sculptures which were unrealised at the time of the artist’s death in 1996.

Flavin frequently intended to produce works in series of 3 or 5, though waited until individual works had been sold before producing others to avoid unneccessary production and storage costs. At the time of the artist’s death, 1000 unrealised works existed in the form of drawings and exhibition copies; if produced now, the works could have a total value of several million dollars.

The Flavin estate did not manufacture any works not realised in the artist’s lifetime before 2007. The executor of the artist’s estate Stephen Flavin, son of the artist, explained this initial decision in an article in The Art Newspaper, stating: “I thought that limiting the number of works in the world to what Dan sold during his lifetime, and had certificates for, actually simplified matters”. A reversal of this position came following a retrospective of the artist’s works at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, which inspired a peak in public interest. It is unclear whether Dan Flavin had envisaged the production of his works to continue beyond his death.

Controversy regarding the authenticity of Maurice Utrillo painting

London, 6 June 2013, Art Media Agency (AMA).

According to an article in The Art Newspaper, a controversy has emerged regarding the authenticity of a painting attributed to Maurice Utrillo.

Theodore Rabb, an emeritus Professor of History at the University of Princeton, presented the work, entitled Le Moulin de la Galette, at Sotheby’s, London, stating that it was by French painter Maurice Utrillo. The auction house subsequently sent photographs of the piece to be assessed by Jean Fabris, the Paris-based owner of the artist’s droit moral. According to Fabris, the painting given by Rabb is a forgery.

The case is proving controversial as, though the painting seems to come from a reliable source, under French law, the opinion of the holder of Utrillo’s droit moral is enough to recall the work from auction entirely. The painting had been purchased by Rabb’s parents at Redfern Gallery, London, and carries a mark on its reverse which indicates that it was once part of a collection owned by Louis Bergman, an amateur enthusiast whose interest focused on French 20th-century paintings.

Jean Fabris, owner of Utrillo’s droit moral, is authorised to defend and protect the artist’s works, though in theory does not have any role to play in  identifying their authenticity. His opinion, however, has come to widely respected: Fabris currently charges €2000 to issue a certificate of authentication for the artist’s work, a practice which appears to have cemented his standing as an Utrillo expert.

Launch of The Art Newspaper China

Beijing, 12 December 2012, Art Media Agency (AMA).

The Art Newspaper, publication about the latest news of the art world, has just announced the launch of its Chinese edition. The editor of The Art Newspaper China will be Ye Ying, currently artistic director of Bloomberg Businessweek/China.

Indeed, The Art Newspaper has entered into a partnership with the Beijing-based Modern Media Group. Together they will release The Art Newspaper China from the beginning of 2013. This new publication will join the network of newspapers founded by Umberto Allemandi that comprises The Art Newspaper, Il Giornale dell’Arte, Le Journal des Arts, Ta Nea Tis Technis, Il Giornale dell’Architettura and The Art Newspaper Russia.

Besides, the Chinese publication will be distributed with Bloomsberg Businessweek/China and the bilingual art criticism journal Leap. The release of the newspaper in Chinese accompanies the development of art market in China. The chief executive of The Art Newspaper China confirms art is “taken seriously by the Chinese government and is of great interest to the rest of the world”. Thomas Shao, chief executive of Modern Media Group, adds that “the Chinese are now curious about the world of art beyond their frontiers, so it is vitally important to launch a professional art newspaper that provides timely and accurate news about the global art scene”.

 

Recent art acquisitions made by Qatar

Doha, 8 July 2011, Art Media Agency (AMA).

According to The Art Newspaper, Qatar is one of the world’s major buyers of modern and contemporary art. A number of important transactions are said to have taken place at private sales and auctions.

The list of works thought to have been purchased by Qatar includes:

“The Merthkin Rothkos”, eleven works by Rothko sold to an “unidentified seller” for $310 million in 2009. The pieces are from the collection of the financier J. Ezra Merkin. Although it was initially rumoured that the Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich was the new owner of the Rothko’s, trustworthy sources have revealed that the works were probably sold to Qatar.

Pieces from the eminent Sonnabend collection are said to have been sold via GPS Partners, Inc. (Giraud, Pissarro, Ségalot) for $400 million. Major works by Roy Lichtenstein and Jeff Koons feature in this collection. Private negotiations took place in 2007 and 2008 and it is probable that Qatar is now the owner of these prestigious artworks.

Claude Berri initially promised a selection of nine works by Ryman, Reinhardt, Morandi, Fontana and Serra to the Centre Pompidou to obtain exemption from estate tax. However, the heirs of the film-maker finally decided to sell the entire set to Qatar for fifty million dollars. This transaction was also negotiated by Philippe Ségalot.

The Men in Her Life (1962) by Andy Warhol was sold at Phillips de Pury in New York for $63.4 million in November 2010. The transaction was once again organised by Philippe Ségalot, who maintains that the painting was acquired by American collectors. A source close to the broker claims that the American company is a second intermediary and that the final buyer could be Qatar.

American statistics indicate that cultural exports to Qatar totalled $428,162,894 from the period covering 2005 to April 2011, with a spike of $250.5 million in 2007, when Qatar purchased the famous Rockefeller Rothko, White Center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose), dating from 1950, for the amount of $72.8 million.

In the first four months of the 2005 to 2011 period, Qatar imported paintings and antiques from the United Kingdom to the value of £128,237,671. In addition, according to financial statistics, the State of Qatar also bought Lullaby Spring (2002) by Damien Hirst in 2007 for £9.2 million at a London auction.

There are numerous other examples of acquisitions: William Hoares’s painting Bath’s Portrait of Diallo (1733) was acquired for £555,000, but the export licence was refused by the British government and the work was loaned to the National Gallery in London. Qatar also purchased Les Chadoufs (1934) by Mahmoud Said for $2.3 million, which is now on view at Mathaf, the Arab Museum of Modern Art in Doha.